Go Compare, Go Compare, other services that don’t have annoying anthems!

Don’t you hate the go compare advert? The irritating earworm was designed to entice customers by associating their service with a chubby middle aged waiter that looks as if he were imitating the videogame character Wario by wearing a . Yeah, they certainly achieved that. The actual outcome was that anyone who hears that advert starts to slam their head against the wall in irritance as the company really scrapes the bottom of the barrel for themes like this to base their adverts on. The advert itself has been re-emerging time and time again on our television sets for years. Each time it plays the same tune and each time it get’s the same response; the utter fathom of our nation. However still, the go compare car insurance company proceeds to create new and more annoying broadcasts. Yes, the company has always tried to enhance their brilliant advert by applying additional humourous features, such as the attempted murder of their main character; Gio Compario. This still even received over 43 complaints from the viewers of national television. So even the attempted murder of their branded superstar is not enough to change the views our nation about the unsatisfactory nature of that demented tune. I mean surely, after the first airing of that advert you’d have thought that they would have seen the negative polls and that their precious advert was hurting their business. First of all, they should have realised that this whole shamble of a plumped waiter singing a song is completely ludicrous as it would have probably been voted -5 out of 10 in Simon Cowel’s vote on X factor. As ultimately these adverts are just a general offence to the public. “Go Compare, Go Compare. Shut the #u@% up” was what my chief executor said when it came on the television the other day. When you manage to anger so many people, including my boss, you know that surely you should have realised you are a dead man walking. But no, instead of taking the easy route and they said “Ok so this isn’t working at the moment but what if we amplify the vocals and add an assasin with a bazooka, maybe that will take us to the top of the advertising market.” Obviously they don’t get the point. I further deduce that there should be a ban on adverts like these. They hurt me to the very core and what’s more, they help nobody! We hate it, so therefore don’t go and check out the website and if we hate it they hate it because it doesn’t increase their profit. We as a nation should enforce our views upon this crack-pot company and lay down the law. No more Gio Compario! No more annoying anthems!

Go Compare, Go Compare, other services that don’t have annoying anthems! Don’t you hate the go compare advert? The irritating earworm was designed to entice customers by associating their service with a chubby middle aged waiter that looks as if he were wearing a slightly boring halloween costume. Yeah, they certainly achieved that. Anyone who hears that advert starts to slam their head against the wall in irritance as the company really scrapes the bottom of the barrel for themes like this to base their adverts on. Aren’t there people that watch these things before they are aired? Surely you woukd have thought that they would have seen the

After the first airing of that advert you’d have thought that they would have seen the negative polls and that the advert was hurting their business and realised that this whole shamble of a plumped waiter that looks like Wario singing a song that would have probably been voted -5 out of 10 in Simon Cowel’s vote on X factor. Ultimately I believe that these adverts are just a general offence to the public. “Go Compare, Go Compare Shut the #u@% up” was what my chief executor said whenever it came on the television the other day. When you manage to anger so many people, including my boss, you know that you are dead man walking. But no, instead of taking the easy route they said “Ok so this isn’t working for the but what if we amplify the vocals and add another verse, maybe that will help our cause.”

I deduce that there should be a ban on adverts like these. They hurt me to the very core and they help nobody! We hate it, so therefore don’t go and check out the website and if we hate it they hate it because it doesn’t increase their profit.

This irritating ear worm was designed to entice customers, instead it gives the complete opposite effect that causes viewers such as you and me to immediately cover our ears and run for the hills, away from this tv trash.

How have the extremes of emotion expressed in Titus Andronicus and selected WWI poetry been effectively created by the writers’ craft and performance of the drama text on stage, on screen and in the classroom?

Shakespeare wrote 37 plays in his lifetime, in this essay I am going to talk about his first: Titus Andronicus.

Similar to plays are poems, this essay is going to draw a comparison between both Shakespeare’s Titus Andronicus and Wilfred Owen’s Anthem for Doomed Youth. Separated over a period of 400 years you would have expected literature to have changed however there are more similarities between these two authors than meets the eye as both of their works were made to be projected by the voice. This causes a range of similar techniques and styles throughout the literature that they created to ensure that the message of the words were heard by their audience which caused a stir of thoughts inside the masses.

Emotions are the key to empathy. Both writers triggered the release of emotions in their works to develop an emphatic link with their audience. Wilfred Owen, born in March 1893 was a soldier stationed on the front lines at the time he was 21. He died on the 4th of November 1918, 7 days before the armistice. He was most famous for his war poems. The reason that he wrote poetry was to spread word of the actual happenings in war as there was a large amount of propaganda giving false information about the glory that war would bring you to ensure the support the war effort. The fact that he died in the war in which he was forewarning produces a large amount of dramatic irony within all of his works. This amplifies the concepts that reside in them and in particular the emotions that they induce.

Similarly, Shakespeare wrote for a large audience, however he wrote for the audience of the theatre in Elizabethan England. This consisted of a dominant male figure as the equality between male and female genders was unbalanced in those times resulting in more gore and stereotypical masculine content such as anger and violence. Being Shakespeare’s first play, he may have written Titus Andronicus commercially, which may be the reason for the fact that the revenge tragedy holds so many scenes of violence and anger. Overall it is seen that his first play was the most violent; with the ending consisting of most of the characters being killed off and giving the effect of pure disgust and pain.

Shakespeare interacts with his audience through acts instead of sole emotion. Acts such as revenge consist of emotions such as anger, grief and hatred, which altogether induce a higher effect of empathy to the audience than just by themselves. So it could be said that the effects of emotions arise when being done in act and acts are some of the ways that Shakespeare communicates the thoughts of his characters. Characters themselves also play a significant part inside the plot line of Titus Andronicus, as they have assigned natures but not just as personality, but as they are the embodiments of the acts themselves.  For example, the embodiment of the act of evil inside the nature of Aaron as Aaron has no motive present inside the play to compensate for his actions which are specifically malicious to that of every character besides his son.

Furthermore a major emotion in Shakespeare that is felt by the audience is Schadenfreude. This German lend word means taking pleasure in others misfortune. A great example of this emotion being exploited would be in Act One Scene One where Titus announces the execution of Alarbus, the heir to the throne of the Goths and Tamora’s first born.

“Alive and dead, and for brethren slain

Religiously they ask for sacrifice:

To his your son is mark’d, and die he must,

T’ appease their groaning shadows that are gone”

Being the opening scene to a revenge tragedy, it seems just right to open up with the death of a character.  This is Titus’ revenge for the death of his 21 sons fighting in the war, hence his announcement of this line: “Alive and dead, and for brethren slain. Religiously they ask for sacrifice:”

Shakespeare uses the technique of repetition of the words associated with death, such as dead, sacrifice and die. This is Shakespeare building tension in the play as words repeated suggest that something drastic is going to occur and the words that reside with death are some of the most powerful.

The line “Religiously they ask for sacrifice” is the most interesting line of the stanza, as it is a metaphor that refers to family vengeance as a religion. Meaning an eye for and eye was more than accepted in this play but actually promoted. This reflects the thoughts of those who dwelled in the ancient Rome, who thought that avenging a family member was justified due to family being a religion, which could be considered as a type of honour. This type of honour relates to that of Wilfred Owen’s works, especially in the aspect of his message about propaganda and the governments censorship of information to ensure that people would support the war effort.

Overall the effect of Schadenfreude is greatly induced by this act of revenge as it communicates the emotions of the characters on stage and in particular those of Titus. In social terms taking pleasure in others misfortune is generally shun upon however we as people do enjoy it. This is exactly what Shakespeare rides upon to kick start the chaos of his revenge tragedy which also pleases that of the audience by providing them with the feeling of Schadenfreude. This play could be Shakespeare exploration of the world of playwright, by pushing the limits of violent and vengeful drama. Yet still an alternate interpretation may be Shakespeare’s lack of experience in his field causing him to write a play that contains too much violence that gives more disgust than Schadenfreude.

Wilfred Owen uses acts such as betrayal in his poem “An anthem for doomed Youth” which communicates also emotions of anger and grief but moreover the emotion of despair. This act of betrayal is caused by the propaganda that prophesised that whoever went to war would come back with glory and honours, therefore associating war with honour. A concept that is almost unapparent inside Titus Andronicus. Wilfred Owen wrote this poem to tell those on the motherland that glorification of war was nothing but a mere façade and that joining the war would lead you to your death. Ultimately the poem was created for the younger audience, around the age of 14-21 as people that were underage were put under heavy pressure to join the war as their fathers and brothers had.

An anthem for doomed youth is a poem in a sonnet styled structure, 14 lines, with 10 syllables per line and it talks about the utter despair and pointlessness of fighting on the front lines. This is enveloped by features such as assonance, which reside in the title, “An anthem for Doomed Youth”. The assonance of the “oo” sound is depressing which communicates the emotion of despair as death by “the monstrous anger of the guns” is not a pleasing nor glorified way to die in battle, promoting the poem’s message.

The title to the poem however holds more than just assonance to hint the reader of the poem’s message as it could actually be considered as an oxymoron. The two words, doomed and youth are never really used into the same context as there is no association between them. A youth is to be ignorant of its mortality whereas a doomed man is to die but without any alternative future. Furthermore, the fact that the word anthem is also present inside the title expresses the link between the state and the doom of the youth as an anthem is to be sung by the patriotic. Ultimately an anthem is stating the glory of the country and the heroism of its inhabitants, not stating the despair and pointlessness of sending its future (The youth) to die in a conflict that they are not fully aware of.

“No mockeries now for them; no prayers nor bells,

Nor any voice of mourning save the choirs,—

The shrill, demented choirs of wailing shells;

And bugles calling for them from sad shires.”

Similarly to Shakespeare, Wilfred Owen uses effect of repetition in his poem to carry the emotion of despair. This works by building upon the word or meaning of no. “No mockeries now for them; no prayers nor bells, Nor any voice of mourning save the choirs.” This use of repetition creates tension within the poem by building upon the concept of no via it being reiterated many times. Which further increases the effect of the emotion despair that is present in the soldiers in the war. Yet still the assonance, repeated vowel sound of “o” is apparent in this verse, also contributing to the overall expression of despair.

The most effective language technique in this verse is simply metaphor, “The shrill, demented choirs of wailing shells;” This powerful metaphor displays both an image and sound of the doomed soldiers marching into their death, being set free from their terrible fate. This line does quite well with the first line of the poem, “What passing-bells for these who die as cattle”, which describes the pointlessness of the soldiers marching into the by describing them as cattle, an anthropomorphic effect that downgrades the value of human, sentient life to that of an animal.

The most apparent reoccurring feature inside this poem would be the reference to instruments and musical elements such as choirs, bells, voices, bugles, etc. This language feature builds upon the concept of the poem being an anthem, however these references are paired with depressing adjectives, strengthening the concept that the poem is a negative anthem. Thus conveying the emotion of despair through the demented chanting of the soldiers on the front line. Overall this amplifies the effect of irony within the poem, which builds upon Wilfred Owen’s death and influences the views and impressions of the audience to side with the poem’s message.

However both works of literature share the aspect that they are both designed to be projected vocally. This can be seen via the presence of a meter, a 10 syllable policy that enables the reader to clearly project his voice in a rhythmic and steady beat. In Titus Andronicus this is called Blank verse, which is any verse composed of unrhymed lines, normally in iambic pentameter. However universally Blank verse is described as poetical device, not playwright.

“Blank verse is poetry written in regular metrical but unrhymed lines, almost always iambic pentameters.”

Wilfred Owen uses a sonnet which is a poetic device similar to that of Shakespeare’s Blank verse. Iambic pentameter is spoken in a 2:5 rhythm. This similarity overall may be due to the writers preference or simply their paths of education. Both authors were raised in England but were raised at different times with different paths of education however both still write in a similar style; an even systematic and symmetrical structure that provides footing for a performance of their works however differing in rhyme which is a language device that Shakespeare does not use in his Blank verse.

Shakespeare does have some other features that support his cause as a playwright, such as his use of a monosyllabic line: “If the winds rage, doth not the sea wax mad.” The use of this language technique fits perfectly with both the 10 syllable policy of blank verse and Iambic pentameter. This is due to the staccato sound that is emitted when they are pronounced. 10 syllables consecutively projected conveying a quick angry tone, as if you were taking ten rapid blows to the chest. When said by Titus in act 3 scene 1 this turns his speech from sadness to anger and is easily recognisable to the audience as a turning point in Titus’ thoughts.

“If there were reason for these miseries,                                                      10 syllables

Then into limits could I bind my woes:                                                          10 syllables

When heaven doth weep, doth not the earth o’erflow ?                            11 syllables: Break in the meter

If the winds rage, doth not the sea wax mad                                                10 syllables

Threatening the welkin with his big-swoln face?                                          11 syllables: Break in the meter

And wilt thou have a reason for this coil?                                                       10 syllables

I am the sea; hark, how her sighs do blow!                                                   10 syllables

She is the weeping welkin, I the earth:                                                          10 syllables

Then must my sea be moved with her sighs;”                                                               9 syllables: Break in the meter In act 3 scene 1 Titus is portraying his emotions to the audience by talking about the trauma that he has experienced throughout the play. In this scene Shakespeare subtly shifts the metre. This shift embodies Titus’ fall in nobility and sanity as a break in the metre. Usually a break in the metre shows a change of thought however in this case it is constantly being broken, almost as if Titus is stuttering when he speaks. This communicates to the audience that Titus is no longer the character he once was. In reality people under high emotional pressure stutter, this is due to them recalling their troubled past as when a past situation is serious enough, it becomes engraved into your mind. This is usually as the memories from traumatic situations are so vivid causing them to keep remerging and breaking trains of thought. Thus Shakespeare, however not a supposed psychologist manages to reflect aspects of reality by twisting the nature of a post traumatic candidates speech through a constant break in the meter which in turn subtly hints the audience of Titus’ degrading mental state.

This exploration of playwright is a common aspect that remerges throughout the play. This is shown through scenes such as Lavinia’s rape which would not be in the work of any playwright in this century. This is possibly due to the more balanced society of our times. Our society looks upon rape in utter disgust, ultimately as it is an act of evil. This putrid act or any “non-consensual offences with the involvement of the victim’s sexual autonomy” will give the offender at least 13 years in custody with a shunning of society. This was not the same case at the same times of Titus Andronicus as the Romans were known for a large amount of incest and sexual crimes. Shakespeare was simply trying to reflect the nature of the Romans inside his work however with the essence of an experimentalist. This shows just how the interpretations of Titus Andronicus has changed throughout its lifetime. Thus showing how violence and anger has retained, if not grown its effect throughout time.

Furthermore Shakespeare was greatly inspired by the works of Ovid’s metamorphoses. These tomes of myths and legends were written in Latin around the Roman period (25 BC) and contain stories similar to that of the rape of Lavinia. Wilfred Owen was not someone who was inspired by that of some old tomes but by that of the terrors of war. The combat of World War One was tragic, compared to Titus Andronicus the scenes of violence were more void and surreal, yet when someone looks upon and reads scenes such as Lavinia’s rape, the scale seems to tip in the way of her rape. This shows that even with the deaths of millions, one brutal offence of rape gives a larger emotional effect of horror than that of death.

The reasons for this are beyond me. Maybe it is the affection that we give to individuals, than that to a whole, focusing on one sole person and trying to understand them gives us emotional attachment to that person. While with a couple million people, the affection is shared.

Possibly the style and language that Shakespeare uses is simply better than Wilfred Owen’s as it communicates a much more precise and drastic emotional effect. Wilfred Owen uses much more subtle techniques to cross his message such as layers in poems.

Or maybe it is just our evolutionary stage. In Elizabethan Britain, vengeance of a family member is seen as honour, almost as a religion. At the times of the great conflict of World War One, supporting the war was seen as a duty, similar to that of honour for our fellow citizens. Today it is simply our honour for one another, the kindness that we have evolved to give through learning about the pain of others. Extremes of emotion simply keep us evolving, that’s why war, rape and violence are so fruitful in effect. This is why World War One is not just seen as a disaster, but as a lesson or a turning point for future generations.

“It’s usually the deepest pain which empowers you to grow to your full potential.”

                                                                                       

 

Explore the ways the theme of thwarted dreams and aspirations is developed in of mice and men.

Steinbeck’s novella “Of Mice and Men” contains a central theme in which the main characters, Lennie and George reach for; a dream. The two protagonists sought for a dream similar to that of the American dream which is a privately owned piece of land in which they can live off, instead of wandering aimlessly across the country looking for work. “George’s voice became deeper. He repeated his words rhythmically as though he had said them many times before. Guys like us, that work on ranches, are the loneliest guys in the world. They got no family. They don’t belong no place. They come to a ranch an’ work up a stake and then they go inta town and blow their stake.” The quote above is the start of George’s spoken account of his dream which includes Steinbeck’s general impression of the American people who lived throughout that period. The quote is a prime example of Steinbeck giving his opinion of society by implementing it into the voice of his characters. Furthermore the author introduces the central theme of the dream through that of a story: “George’s voice became deeper. He repeated his words rhythmically as though he had said them many times before.” The dream is framed as if it is that typical story told around a campfire; like a legend passed down by many generations. The way that the George is described as having repeated the story many times increases the concept that the story has been said many times. What’s more is that Steinbeck does reiterate the dream but through the mouths of other characters but every time it is reiterated the dream, the reiteration is both more exaggerated and closer to being achieved. Certain language features inside this quote explain the nature of the two protagonists. Such as the fact that the word and has an apostrophe. This is colloquial speech that strengthens the idea that the book is set in another time, other to that of modern America and that both characters are workers. Yet the greatest feeling that is induced by this is that of friendship. Colloquial language is used by friends as they trust that they both understand each other and will be relaxed if anything is said differently also meaning that they see a lot of each other, in this case they practically live with each other. What’s more is that this first paragraph is foreshadow. The ending of the book leaves everything in this paragraph to become true and thus creating the effect of irony at the end of the book. This effect is amplified throughout the book similarly to the way that the dream is. Which is Steinbeck’s message: The closer that you get to achieve your dream, the further away it becomes. “But you ain’t gonna get in no trouble, because if you do, I won’t let you tend the rabbits.” This quote is George’s instruction to Lennie to not cause anything to go wrong within this ranch. The line itself is quite a childish one. Already the reader can tell that there is something mentally wrong with Lennie as Lennie is portrayed as a childish brute who in lack of intelligence who causes his best friend to become stricken with regret due to the fact that they have been sent roaming around the country due to Lennie causing trouble. However George seems to at the start of the book to lack the wit to leave his friend hence:

“If you don’ want me I can go off in the hills an’ find a cave. I can go away any time. No-look! I was jus’ foolin’, Lennie ‘Cause I want you to stay with me. Trouble with mice is you always kill ‘em.” There is abundant ironic foreshadow here, as the starting set of the book is also the ending set of the book where both times includes the idea of Lennie leaving George except that in this case George refuses and the next time George causes Lennie to leave this world. George also seems to really care for his partner due to the fact he is shouting and passionately stating how he wants Lennie to stay, which is somewhat out of character for George as he is commonly inexpressive of his emotions whereas Lennie is the complete opposite. This is shown by the exclamation mark and overstatement: “No-look! I was jus’ foolin’.” Another reoccurring factor would be the fact that in both this quote and the last Lennie is always referred to with the word trouble. Which is Steinbeck’s implementation of foreshadow and clever use of repetition in language to give the effect that Lennie is dangerous, even though he hasn’t done anything wrong yet. Foreshadowing the complete inevitability of Lennie causing trouble at the ranch and jeopardising the dream they sought for. The dream of Lennie and George is one that is not individual to them but is shared by many ranch members alike such as Candy. “Maybe if I give you guys money, you’ll let me hoe in the garden … You seen what they done to my dog tonight? They says he wasn’t good to himself nor nobody else. When they can me I wish’t someone shoot me.” At this point in the book George and Lennie have settled into the life of a ranch member in Soledad which means solitude in Spanish. This one word is Steinbeck referring to both the great depression, the time at which it is set and that the land itself is sick and lonely and possibly a way to pass the idea that the whole of America is sick with loneliness and with that, all that comes with it, fear, sadness, depression, regret and anger. The fact that George and Lennie’s dream resides with each other causes it to become another method of foreshadow. This is a language feature that conceals the meaning of the book in plain sight; possibly referring to the message of the whole book in a nutshell. Candy in the quote above is announcing his deal to give George and Lennie the money they need to achieve their dream as long as he has a part of it. However Candy also mentions that due to the fact that his dog was killed by Carlson, he is most likely going to end up in the same way. Steinbeck is referring to the prejudice of the old; they are useless and might as well be “shot down like a dog”. This is also the time of the realisation of the dream and how close they are to achieving it. “In one month. Right squack one month.” This is George announcing the time it would take to achieve their dream, causing the reader to This could be counted as Steinbeck giving his message that if you have prejudice against the undesirable, the undesirable may not help you in the future. Carlson however not containing prejudice didn’t recognise the emotional value that Candy shared with his dog and through ignorance killed his dog without any idea of how Candy felt, this is in a way prejudice against Candy even out of ignorance. In all Steinbeck gives all the characters inside the book an underlying relationship to the reality of the great depression. Candy is the Old and feeble, Lennie is the mentally disabled and George is simply the everyday guy. They are all playing different roles yet are unified under the dream, similar to that of the American dream. Later on the paragraph Lennie is confronted by Curly, a lightweight champion who has a disliking to those who are larger than him. Curly has a hot temper, most likely to conceal his weakness that he’s a lightweight champion and therefore gets annihilated by heavyweight in the ring. Irritated through this genetic weakness Curly strikes Lennie who was instructed by George to not cause any trouble which causes him to be reluctant to strike back. Curly does this to conceal his weakness and show that he can beat a bigger guy. Weakness is another theme in the book in which all characters choose to conceal as George tries to hide Lennie’s mental disability or Candy’s and his attachment to his dog. Steinbeck voices this message through Curly’s wife “You’re all scared of each other, that’s what. Relation to Lennie’s inevitability to keep out of trouble and thus the destruction of dreams.

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How have the extremes of emotion expressed in Titus Andronicus and selected WWI poetry been effectively created by the writers’ craft and performance of the drama text on stage, on screen and in the classroom? Shakespeare wrote 37 plays in his lifetime, in this essay I am going to talk about his first: Titus Andronicus. Similar to plays are poems, this essay is going to draw a comparison between both Shakespeare’s Titus Andronicus and Wilfred Owen’s Anthem for Doomed Youth. Separated over a period of 400 years you would have expected literature to have changed however there are more similarities between these two authors than meets the eye as both of their works were made to be projected by the voice. This causes a range of similar techniques and styles throughout the literature that they created to ensure that the message of the words were heard by their audience which caused a stir of thoughts inside the masses. Emotions are the key to empathy. Both writers triggered the release of emotions in their works to develop an emphatic link with their audience. Wilfred Owen, born in March 1893 was a soldier stationed on the front lines at the time he was 21. He died on the 4th of November 1918, 7 days before the armistice. He was most famous for his war poems. The reason that he wrote poetry was to spread word of the actual happenings in war as there was a large amount of propaganda giving false information about the glory that war would bring you to ensure the support the war effort. The fact that he died in the war in which he was forewarning produces a large amount of dramatic irony within all of his works. This amplifies the concepts that reside in them and in particular the emotions that they induce. Similarly, Shakespeare wrote for a large audience, however he wrote for the audience of the theatre in Elizabethan England. This consisted of a dominant male figure as the equality between male and female genders was unbalanced in those times resulting in more gore and stereotypical masculine content such as anger and violence. Being Shakespeare’s first play, he may have written Titus Andronicus commercially, which may be the reason for the fact that the revenge tragedy holds so many scenes of violence and anger. Overall it is seen that his first play was the most violent; with the ending consisting of most of the characters being killed off and giving the effect of pure disgust and pain. Shakespeare interacts with his audience through acts instead of sole emotion. Acts such as revenge consist of emotions such as anger, grief and hatred, which altogether induce a higher effect of empathy to the audience than just by themselves. So it could be said that the effects of emotions arise when being done in act and acts are some of the ways that Shakespeare communicates the thoughts of his characters. Furthermore a. major emotion in Shakespeare that is felt by the audience is Schadenfreude. This German lend word means taking pleasure in others misfortune. A great example of this emotion being exploited would be in Act One Scene One where Titus announces the execution of Alarbus, the heir to the throne of the Goths and Tamora’s first born. Alive and dead, and for brethren slain Religiously they ask for sacrifice: To his your son is mark’d, and die he must, T’ appease their groaning shadows that are gone Being the opening scene to a revenge tragedy, it seems just right to open up with the death of a character. This is Titus’ revenge for the death of his 21 sons fighting in the war, hence his announcement of this line: “Alive and dead, and for brethren slain. Religiously they ask for sacrifice:” Shakespeare uses the technique of repetition of the words associated with death, such as dead, sacrifice and die. This is Shakespeare building tension in the play as words repeated suggest that something drastic is going to occur and the words that reside with death are some of the most powerful. The line “Religiously they ask for sacrifice” is the most interesting line of the stanza, as it is a metaphor that refers to family vengeance as a religion. Meaning an eye for and eye was more than accepted in this play but actually promoted. This reflects the thoughts of those who dwelled in the ancient Rome, who thought that avenging a family member was justified due to family being a religion, which could be considered as a type of honour. This type of honour relates to that of Wilfred Owen’s works, especially in the aspect of his message about propaganda and the governments censorship of information to ensure that people would support the war effort. Overall the effect of Schadenfreude is greatly induced by this act of revenge as it communicates the emotions of the characters on stage and in particular those of Titus. Taking pleasure in others misfortune is generally shun upon however we as people do enjoy it and that is exactly what to kick start the chaos of his revenge tragedy but also pleasing that of the audience by providing them with the feeling of Schadenfreude. This play could be Shakespeare exploration of the world of playwright, by pushing the limits of violent and vengeful drama. Yet still an alternate interpretation may be Shakespeare’s lack of experience in his field causing him to write a play that contains too much violence that gives more disgust than Schadenfreude. Wilfred Owen uses acts such as betrayal in his poem “An anthem for doomed Youth” which communicates also emotions of anger and grief but moreover the emotion of despair. This act of betrayal is caused by the propaganda that prophesised that whoever went to war would come back with glory and honours, therefore associating war with honour. A concept that is almost unapparent inside Titus Andronicus. Wilfred Owen wrote this poem to tell those on the motherland that glorification of war was nothing but a mere façade and that joining the war would lead you to your death. Ultimately the poem was created for the younger audience, around the age of 14-21 as people that were underage were put under heavy pressure to join the war as their fathers and brothers had. An anthem for doomed youth is a poem in a sonnet styled structure, 14 lines, with 10 syllables per line and it talks about the utter despair and pointlessness of fighting on the front lines. This is enveloped by features such as assonance, which reside in the title, “An anthem for Doomed Youth”. The assonance of the “oo” sound is depressing which communicates the emotion of despair as death by “the monstrous anger of the guns” is not a pleasing nor glorified way to die in battle, promoting the poem’s message. The title to the poem however holds more than just assonance to hint the reader of the poem’s message as it could actually be considered as an oxymoron. The two words, doomed and youth are never really used into the same context as there is no association between them. A youth is to be ignorant of its mortality whereas a doomed man is to die but without any alternative future. Furthermore, the fact that the word anthem is also present inside the title expresses the link between the state and the doom of the youth as an anthem is to be sung by the patriotic. Ultimately an anthem is stating the glory of the country and the heroism of its inhabitants, not stating the despair and pointlessness of sending its future (The youth) to die in a conflict that they are not fully aware of. No mockeries now for them; no prayers nor bells, Nor any voice of mourning save the choirs,— The shrill, demented choirs of wailing shells; And bugles calling for them from sad shires. Similarly to Shakespeare, Wilfred Owen uses effect of repetition in his poem to carry the emotion of despair. This works by building upon the word or meaning of no. “No mockeries now for them; no prayers nor bells, Nor any voice of mourning save the choirs.” This use of repetition creates tension within the poem by building upon the concept of no via it being reiterated many times. Which further increases the effect of the emotion despair that is present in the soldiers in the war. Yet still the assonance, repeated vowel sound of “o” is apparent in this verse, also contributing to the overall expression of despair. The most effective language technique in this verse is simply metaphor, “The shrill, demented choirs of wailing shells;” This powerful metaphor displays both an image and sound of the doomed soldiers marching into their death, being set free from their terrible fate. This line does quite well with the first line of the poem, “What passing-bells for these who die as cattle”, which describes the pointlessness of the soldiers marching into the by describing them as cattle, an anthropomorphic effect that downgrades the value of human, sentient life to that of an animal. The most apparent reoccurring feature inside this poem would be the reference to instruments and musical elements such as choirs, bells, voices, bugles, etc. This language feature builds upon the concept of the poem being an anthem, however these references are paired with depressing adjectives, strengthening the concept that the poem is a negative anthem. Thus conveying the emotion of despair through the demented chanting of the soldiers on the front line. Overall this amplifies the effect of irony within the poem, which builds upon Wilfred Owen’s death and influences the views and impressions of the audience to side with the poem’s message. However both works of literature share the aspect that they are both designed to be projected vocally. This can be seen via the presence of a meter, a 10 syllable policy that enables the reader to clearly project his voice in a rhythmic and steady beat. In Titus Andronicus this is called Blank verse, which is any verse composed of unrhymed lines, normally in iambic pentameter. However universally Blank verse is described as poetical device, not playwright. “Blank verse is poetry written in regular metrical but unrhymed lines, almost always iambic pentameters. “ Wilfred Owen uses a sonnet which is a poetic device similar to that of Shakespeare’s Blank verse. Iambic pentameter is spoken in a 2:5 rhythm. This similarity overall may be due to the writers preference or simply their paths of education. Both authors were raised in England but were raised at different times however both still write in a similar style; an even systematic and symmetrical structure that provides footing for a performance of their works however differing in rhyme which is a language device that Shakespeare does not use in his Blank verse. Shakespeare does have some other features that support his cause as a playwright, such as his use of a monosyllabic line: “If the winds rage, doth not the sea wax mad.” The use of this language technique fits perfectly with both the 10 syllable policy of blank verse and Iambic pentameter. This is due to the staccato sound that is emitted when they are pronounced. 10 syllables consecutively projected conveying a quick angry tone, as if you were taking ten rapid blows to the chest. When said by Titus in act 3 scene 1 this turns his speech from sadness to anger and is easily recognisable to the audience as a turning point in Titus’ thoughts. In act 3 scene 1 Titus is portraying his emotions to the audience and talking about the trauma that he has experienced. Throughout this scene Shakespeare subtly shifts the metre. This reflects Titus’ fall in nobility and sanity as a break in the metre; usually a break in the metre shows a change of thought however in this case it is constantly being broken, almost as if Titus is stuttering when he speaks. This communicates to the audience that Titus is no longer the character he once was. In reality people under high emotional pressure stutter, this is due to them recalling their troubled past as when a past situation is serious enough, it becomes engraved into your mind. This is usually as the memories are so vivid that they keep remerging and breaking your train of thought.

Prejudice Lennie and George: House Page 15: dream establishment, they are sustained by this. Related to the American dream, independence.

Crooks: page 83 Every dream is destroyed. “I seen hundreds of men come by on the road an’ on the ranches….. Cynical realism

86: hope: “I never really seen a guy do it,” I seen a guy

94: retraction of offer: well just forget it, realisation of vulnerability

Curley’s Wife: page 88

How have the extremes of emotion expressed in Titus Andronicus and selected WWI poetry been effectively created by the writers’ craft and performance of the drama text on stage, on screen and in the classroom? Shakespeare wrote 37 plays in his lifetime, in this essay I am going to talk about his first: Titus Andronicus. Similar to plays are poems, this essay is going to draw a comparison between both Shakespeare’s Titus Andronicus and Wilfred Owen’s Anthem for Doomed Youth. Separated over a period of 400 years you would have expected literature to have changed however there are more similarities between these two authors than meets the eye as both of their works were made to be projected by the voice. This causes a range of similar techniques and styles throughout the literature that they created to ensure that the message of the words were heard by their audience which caused a stir of thoughts inside the masses. Emotions are the key to empathy. Both writers triggered the release of emotions in their works to develop an emphatic link with their audience. Wilfred Owen, born in March 1893 was a soldier stationed on the front lines at the time he was 21. He died on the 4th of November 1918, 7 days before the armistice. He was most famous for his war poems. The reason that he wrote poetry was to spread word of the actual happenings in war as there was a large amount of propaganda giving false information about the glory that war would bring you to ensure the support the war effort. The fact that he died in the war in which he was forewarning produces a large amount of dramatic irony within all of his works. This amplifies the concepts that reside in them and in particular the emotions that they induce. Similarly, Shakespeare wrote for a large audience, however he wrote for the audience of the theatre in Elizabethan England. This consisted of a dominant male figure as the equality between male and female genders was unbalanced in those times resulting in more gore and stereotypical masculine content such as anger and violence. Being Shakespeare’s first play, he may have written Titus Andronicus commercially, which may be the reason for the fact that the revenge tragedy holds so many scenes of violence and anger. Overall it is seen that his first play was the most violent; with the ending consisting of most of the characters being killed off and giving the effect of pure disgust and pain. Shakespeare interacts with his audience through acts instead of sole emotion. Acts such as revenge consist of emotions such as anger, grief and hatred, which altogether induce a higher effect of empathy to the audience than just by themselves. So it could be said that the effects of emotions arise when being done in act and acts are some of the ways that Shakespeare communicates the thoughts of his characters. Furthermore a. major emotion in Shakespeare that is felt by the audience is Schadenfreude. This German lend word means taking pleasure in others misfortune. A great example of this emotion being exploited would be in Act One Scene One where Titus announces the execution of Alarbus, the heir to the throne of the Goths and Tamora’s first born. Alive and dead, and for brethren slain Religiously they ask for sacrifice: To his your son is mark’d, and die he must, T’ appease their groaning shadows that are gone Being the opening scene to a revenge tragedy, it seems just right to open up with the death of a character. This is Titus’ revenge for the death of his 21 sons fighting in the war, hence his announcement of this line: “Alive and dead, and for brethren slain. Religiously they ask for sacrifice:” Shakespeare uses the technique of repetition of the words associated with death, such as dead, sacrifice and die. This is Shakespeare building tension in the play as words repeated suggest that something drastic is going to occur and the words that reside with death are some of the most powerful. The line “Religiously they ask for sacrifice” is the most interesting line of the stanza, as it is a metaphor that refers to family vengeance as a religion. Meaning an eye for and eye was more than accepted in this play but actually promoted. This reflects the thoughts of those who dwelled in the ancient Rome, who thought that avenging a family member was justified due to family being a religion. Overall the effect of Schadenfreude is greatly induced by this act of revenge as it communicates the emotions of the characters on stage and in particular those of Titus. Taking pleasure in others misfortune is generally shun upon however we as people do enjoy it and that is exactly what to kick start the chaos of his revenge tragedy but also pleasing that of the audience by providing them with the feeling of Schadenfreude. This play could be Shakespeare exploration of the world of playwright, by pushing the limits of violent and vengeful drama. Yet still an alternate interpretation may be Shakespeare’s lack of experience in his field causing him to write a play that contains too much violence that gives more disgust than Schadenfreude. Wilfred Owen uses acts such as betrayal in his poem “An anthem for doomed Youth” which communicates also emotions of anger and grief but moreover the emotion of despair. This act of betrayal is caused by the propaganda that prophesised that whoever went to war would come back with glory and honours. Wilfred Owen wrote this poem to tell those on the motherland that glorification of war was nothing but a mere façade and that joining the war would lead you to your death. Ultimately the poem was created for the younger audience, around the age of 14-21 as people that were underage were put under heavy pressure to join the war as their fathers and brothers had. An anthem for doomed youth is a poem in a sonnet styled structure, 14 lines, with 10 syllables per line and it talks about the utter despair and pointlessness of fighting on the front lines. This is enveloped by features such as assonance, which reside in the title, “An anthem for Doomed Youth”. The assonance of the “oo” sound is depressing which communicates the emotion of despair as death by “the monstrous anger of the guns” is not a pleasing nor glorified way to die in battle, promoting the poem’s message. The title to the poem however holds more than just assonance to hint the reader of the poem’s message as it could actually be considered as an oxymoron. The two words, doomed and youth are never really used into the same context as there is no association between them. A youth is to be ignorant of its mortality whereas a doomed man is to die but without any alternative future. Furthermore, the fact that the word anthem is also present inside the title expresses the link between the state and the doom of the youth as an anthem is to be sung by the patriotic. Ultimately an anthem is stating the glory of the country and the heroism of its inhabitants, not stating the despair and pointlessness of sending its future (The youth) to die in a conflict that they are not fully aware of. No mockeries now for them; no prayers nor bells, Nor any voice of mourning save the choirs,— The shrill, demented choirs of wailing shells; And bugles calling for them from sad shires. Similarly to Shakespeare, Wilfred Owen uses effect of repetition in his poem to carry the emotion of despair. This works by building upon the word or meaning of no. “No mockeries now for them; no prayers nor bells, Nor any voice of mourning save the choirs.” This use of repetition creates tension within the poem by building upon the concept of no via it being reiterated many times. Which further increases the effect of the emotion despair that is present in the soldiers in the war. Yet still the assonance, repeated vowel sound of “o” is apparent in this verse, also contributing to the overall expression of despair. The most effective language technique in this verse is simply metaphor, “The shrill, demented choirs of wailing shells;” This powerful metaphor displays both an image and sound of the doomed soldiers marching into their death, being set free from their terrible fate. This line does quite well with the first line of the poem, “What passing-bells for these who die as cattle”, which describes the pointlessness of the soldiers marching into the by describing them as cattle, an anthropomorphic effect that downgrades the value of human, sentient life to that of an animal. The most apparent reoccurring feature inside this poem would be the reference to instruments and musical elements such as choirs, bells, voices, bugles etc. This language feature builds upon the concept of the poem being an anthem, however these references are paired with depressing adjectives, strengthening the concept that the poem is a negative anthem. Thus conveying the emotion of despair through the demented chanting of the soldiers on the front line. Overall this amplifies the effect of irony within the poem, which builds upon Wilfred Owen’s death and influences the views and impressions of the audience to side with the poem’s message.

How have the extremes of emotion expressed in Titus Andronicus and selected WWI poetry been effectively created by the writers’ craft and performance of the drama text on stage, on screen and in the classroom? Shakespeare wrote 37 plays in his lifetime, in this essay I am going to talk about his first: Titus Andronicus. Similar to plays are poems, this essay is going to draw a comparison between both Shakespeare’s Titus Andronicus and Wilfred Owen’s Anthem for Doomed Youth. Separated over a period of 400 years you would have expected literature to have changed however there are more similarities between these two authors than meets the eye as both of their works were made to be projected by the voice. This causes a range of similar techniques and styles throughout the literature that they created to ensure that the message of the words were heard by their audience which caused a stir of thoughts inside the masses. Emotions are the key to empathy. Both writers triggered the release of emotions in their works to develop an emphatic link with their audience. Wilfred Owen, born in March 1893 was a soldier stationed on the front lines at the time he was 21. He died on the 4th of November 1918, 7 days before the armistice. He was most famous for his war poems. The reason that he wrote poetry was to spread word of the actual happenings in war as there was a large amount of propaganda giving false information about the glory that war would bring you to ensure the support the war effort. The fact that he died in the war in which he was forewarning produces a large amount of dramatic irony within all of his works. This amplifies the concepts that reside in them and in particular the emotions that they induce. Similarly Shakespeare wrote for a large audience, however he wrote for the audience of the theatre in Elizabethan England. This consisted of a dominant male figure as the equality between male and female genders was unbalanced in those times resulting in more gore and masculine content such as anger and violence. Being Shakespeare’s first play, he may have written Titus Andronicus commercially speaking, which may be the reason for the fact that the revenge tragedy holds so many scenes of violence and anger. Overall it is seen that his first play was the most violent; with the ending consisting of most of the characters being killed off and giving the effect of pure disgust and pain. Shakespeare interacts with his audience through acts instead of sole emotion. Acts such as revenge consist of emotions such as anger, grief and hatred, which altogether induce a higher effect of empathy to the audience than just by themselves. So it could be said that the effects of emotions arise when being done by an act and this act is one of the ways that Shakespeare communicates the thoughts of his characters. A major emotion in Shakespeare that is felt by the audience is Schadenfreude. This German lend word means taking pleasure in others misfortune. A great example of this emotion being exploited would be in Act One Scene One where Titus announces the execution of Alarbus, the heir to the throne of the Goths and Tamora’s first born. Alive and dead, and for brethren slain Religiously they ask for sacrifice: To his your son is mark’d, and die he must, T’ appease their groaning shadows that are gone Being the opening scene to a revenge tragedy, it seems just right to open up with the death of a character. This is Titus’ revenge for the death of his 21 sons fighting in the war, hence the quote “Alive and dead, and for brethren slain. Religiously they ask for sacrifice:” Shakespeare uses the technique of repetition of the words associated with death, such as dead, sacrifice and die. This is Shakespeare building tension in the play as words repeated suggest that something drastic is going to occur and the words that reside with death are some of the most powerful. The line “Religiously they ask for sacrifice” is the most interesting line of the stanza, as it is a metaphor that refers to family vengeance as a religion. Meaning an eye for and eye was more than accepted in this play but actually promoted. This reflects the thoughts of those who dwelled in the ancient Rome, who thought that avenging a family member was justified due to family being a religion. Overall the effect of Schadenfreude is greatly induced by this act of revenge as it communicates the emotions of the characters on stage and in particular those of Titus. Taking pleasure in others misfortune is generally shun upon however we as people do enjoy it and that is exactly what to kick start the chaos of his revenge tragedy but also pleasing that of the audience by providing them with the feeling of Schadenfreude. Wilfred Owen uses acts such as betrayal in his poem “An anthem for doomed Youth” which communicates also emotions of anger and grief but moreover the emotion of despair. This act of betrayal is caused by the propaganda that prophesised that whoever went to war would come back with glory and honours. Wilfred Owen wrote this poem to tell those on the motherland that glorification of war was nothing but a mere façade and that joining the war would lead you to your death. Ultimately the poem was created for the younger audience, around the age of 14-21 as people that were underage were put under heavy pressure to join the war as their fathers and brothers had. An anthem for doomed youth is a poem in a sonnet styled structure, 14 lines, with 10 syllables per line and it talks about the utter despair and pointlessness of fighting on the front lines. This is enveloped by features such as assonance that reside in the title, “An anthem for Doomed Youth”. The assonance of the “oo” sound is quite depressing and communicates the emotion of despair as death by “the monstrous anger of the guns” is not a pleasing nor glorified way to die in battle.

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